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Full text of "Winners of the first Presidential Awards for Design Excellence, January 30, 1985"

PRESIDENTIAL 




WM 



mm 




Winners of the First 
Presidential Awards 
for Design Excellence 
January 30, 1985 



Design Assemblies, the Federal Architec- 
ture Project, the Federal Graphics Im- 
provement Program, and the Excellence 
Attracts Excellence program with the Of- 
fice of Personnel Management. 

The Presidential Design Awards have 
special symbolic value. They call atten- 
tion to design quality at the highest level 
of government. Through the President, they 
bring to all of us a sense of what can be. 



Introduction 

The Presidential Design Awards Program 
is the first government-wide effort to rec- 
ognize and foster excellence in Federal 
design efforts. President Reagan stated 
on establishing the awards that: 
". . . what we build, print, or cause to be 
manufactured for Federal use directly af- 
fects every citizen. We must ensure that 
these vast investments are cost-effective, 
well-planned, and reflect the standards 
of excellence which we all expect from 
our government." 

The thirteen winners of the first Presi- 
dential Awards for Design Excellence ex- 
emplify the standards of excellence that 
should be expected from the Federal gov- 
ernment. The best design results from 
careful planning, technical creativity, 
and sensitivity to human requirements 
and sensibilities. It is an instrument to 
better inform, organize, assist, and serve. 
It should reflect our diverse cultural val- 
ues and the highest standards. 

I believe that these winners clearly il- 
lustrate what is possible when dedicated 
designers work with able administrators 
to produce functional, cost-effective 
products and public services. Excellence 
in Federal design requires not only de- 
signers of skill and creativity, but admin- 
istrators and lawmakers who provide 
mandates and policies to stimulate good 
design. 

The Presidential Design Awards Pro- 
gram was managed by the National En- 
dowment for the Arts as part of its efforts 
to nurture and recognize design excel- 
lence in America. Through its Federal 
Design Improvement Project, the Endow- 
ment's commitment to Federal design ex- 
cellence is long-standing and includes 
initiation of such projects as the Federal 



Frank Hodsoll 

Chairman, National Endowment for the Arts 



/sSn 


) 



Report of the 
Presidential Design 
Awards Jury 

The Presidential Design Awards Program 
was established in December 1983 to rec- 
ognize exemplary achievements in Fed- 
eral design in the fields of architecture, 
engineering design, graphic design, inte- 
rior design, landscape architecture, prod- 
uct/industrial design, and urban design 
and planning. This is the first govern- 
ment-wide design awards program and 
its Presidential sponsorship places the is- 
sue of design excellence at the highest 
level of government. 

Quality in design has been a national 
cause since the founding of our Re- 
public. In the planning and design of 
Washington, both George Washington 
and Thomas Jefferson recognized that 
the success of the nation was linked to 
the vision that people had of themselves 
and the buildings that housed their 
institutions. 

In the twentieth century, this condi- 
tion continues with the Federal Design 



Improvement Project administered by the 
National Endowment for the Arts — an 
effort strongly supported by four Presi- 
dents for over a decade. In 1982, Federal 
projects in the fields of design and con- 
struction amounted to approximately 
forty billion dollars. Most of these ex- 
penditures exert an important influence 
on design practices in the private sector, 
either from the scope and volume of 
everyday products necessary to the opera- 
tion of government or from specially de- 
signed products which have been 
adapted for civilian or commercial use. 
Therefore, a Federal mandate for design 
quality affects the entire environment 
and contributes to improving the quality 
of life of the people of this country. 

It should be recognized that the bene- 
fits of design excellence also have eco- 
nomic implications. The vast majority of 
advanced industrial nations have na- 
tional design programs and their busi- 
ness and government leaders have 
recognized that good design is good busi- 
ness. As part of our effort to improve the 
nation's competitiveness in world trade, 
the Federal government's leadership in 
improving American design standards is 
both timely and important. 

In this context, the jury applauds the 
Federal government's initiative in estab- 
lishing the Presidential Design Awards 
Program. From among 630 submissions, 
91 have been selected to receive Federal 
Design Achievement Awards, 13 of 
which have been chosen to receive the 
Presidential Award for Design 
Excellence. 

Projects receiving the Presidential 
Award range from a simple prosthetic de- 
vice commissioned by the Veterans Ad- 
ministration to free amputees from the 
physical and visual implications of their 
disability to the Department of the Inte- 
rior's program of tax incentives for his- 
toric preservation — a program engender- 
ing thousands of private-sector projects 
that have raised public appreciation of 
America's architectural heritage. 

By far the largest number of entries 
were submitted under the category of 
graphic design, ranging from a single 
postage stamp to a total graphic com- 
munications program. Especially note- 
worthy is the visual communications 



system developed by the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration whose 
posters, publications, and logotype gen- 
erally maintain a high standard of design 
which truly captures the spirit and vi- 
tality of the space program. 

The jury further wishes to call atten- 
tion to the importance of the Urban En- 
vironmental Design program of the 
Department of Housing and Urban De- 
velopment which has provided local gov- 
ernments and the professional design 
community with opportunities to make 
our cities more liveable. 

On the other end of the spectrum of de- 
sign, the jury found much to applaud in 
the Art-in-Architecture program of the 
General Services Administration which 
aims to achieve an integration of build- 
ing and works of art. The jury recom- 
mends, however, that greater 
involvement of artists in early stages of 
the design process would significantly al- 
ter the relationship between buildings, 
site, landscaping and works of art. 

In conclusion, the jury would like to 
commend the Federal government for its 
support of quality design and suggests 
that it expand on its already proven rec- 
ord. In order to do this, programs that 
stimulate design through incentives, as 
well as those that create jobs and educa- 
tional possibilities, should be expanded. 
This could include criteria for the selec- 
tion of design professionals from both 
the public and private sectors, peer evalu- 
ation of projects in progress, and recog- 
nition of work that exhibits high 
standards of excellence. Finally, .w+t'*'**'* 
the jury believes that Presi- 
dential endorsement of 
good design, as evidenced ^ 
by completed projects, 
would help create a bet- ^ 
ter climate within the 
Federal government to 
strive for design excel- 
lence resulting in a 
higher quality of life for all. 



******* 



/. Af. Pei 

Jury Chairman 



Jury 
Citations 




• II If"'! 




-E- 



THE INTERCITY BRIDGE 
Pasco/Kennewick, Washington 

'The designers of The Intercity Bridge in the cities 
of Pasco and Kennewick, Washington, and the 
many authorities supporting their efforts are 
given a Presidential Award for Design Excellence 
for their innovative, aesthetic, economical, 
durable and well-received solution for the half- 
mile loop crossing of the Columbia River. 

"The engineers adapted a technique never used 
in the United States before to local site and 
weather conditions: they also used an 
appropriate material — pre-stressed concrete — 
ideally suited to those conditions. The engineers 
were required to establish new design guidelines 
modeled on foreign codes but acceptable to the 
authorities responsible for the project. In all these 
endeavors they succeeded admirably. 

"The Intercity Bridge is not just a great 
technical accomplishment: it is a work of art. The 
use of steel and pre-stressed concrete in striking 
white color, the simplicity of the connections of 
its components, the elegance of the bridge lines, 
and the clarity of its structural behavior enhance 
the beauty of this utilitarian structure in ways 
that can be perceived by both experts and 
laymen. The example of The Intercity Bridge 
should be followed by both technicians and 
Federal authorities in the solution of difficult 
problems." 



B 



HISTORIC PRESERVATION 
TAX INCENTIVES PROGRAM 

'In passing the Federal tax legislation of 1976, the 
Congress made its purpose clear; 'The historic 
and cultural foundations of the Nation should be 
preserved as a living part of our community life 
and development in order to give a sense of order 
to the American people.' As a direct result of this 
tax incentive program, and through the develop- 
ment, application and review process of the Sec- 



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retary of the Interior's "Standards for 
Rehabilitation" and the accompanying 
guidelines, more than 9,000 historic buildings 
nationwide have been rehabilitated and re-used 
in a variety of innovative ways and with a high 
standard of design. 

"The jury commends this effort as a broad 
cultural accomplishment. The Historic Preserva- 
tion Tax Incentives Program encourages the pra 
tical and appropriate reuse of historic buildings. 
It has fostered a revival of skilled craftsmanship 
introduced unusual job opportunities in a chan£ 
ing economy: and brought about a philosophica 
change by demonstrating that the old buildings 
of America can be as serviceable, economical an 
important as the new." 
(Pictured: Sears World Trade. Inc.; Washington, DC 

THE SEATTLE FOOT® 

"The result of a rare collaboration between 
doctors, engineers, and designers, the Seattle 
Foot is a prosthetic device of great mechanical 
simplicity, high efficiency, and modest cost that 
opens up such dynamic exercises as running anc 
ball playing to foot amputees. The device has 
already proven its ability not only to improve tht 
lifestyle of the amputees but also through good 
design to free them of the common visual 
implications of their disability. 

"This award is given to the designers of the 
device and to the Veterans Administration, whic 
supported their effort, in recognition of their 
ingenuity, sense of service and successful 
consideration of all the facets — human, 
technical, and economic — of the difficult 
problem they solved. The dedication of the 
Seattle Foot research group is particularly worth 
of praise and should be an example to other 
groups at a time when most engineers are 
dedicated to the improvement of the implements 
of war." 




£- 



LINN COVE VIADUCT 

Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina 

'The designers of the Linn Cove Viaduct were con- 
fronted with the difficult problem of creating a 
road over a rugged terrain of exceptional beauty 
without interfering with the environment. Their 
solution is technically innovative and respectful 
of the environmental situation. 

"From an engineering point of view, con- 
struction of the roadway by pre-cast, segmental 
concrete elements set from above on segmental 
piers is elegant, economical and new. These tech- 
niques can be used in the service of the environ- 
ment: they provide accessibility by animal life 
both below and around the structure and do not 
damage the forest land, trees, or streams. 

"The roadway results in an elegant curving rib- 
bon that caresses the terrain without using it as a 
support. It gives the motorist the sensation of 
driving tantalizingly on air while the earth goes 
by. 

"For their sensitivity and high technical exper- 
tise, the designers and the authorities who sup- 
ported them well deserve this recognition." 



NASA VISUAL COMMUNICATION 
SYSTEM AND GRAPHIC WORKS 

'The strong visual identity achieved by the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
shows the effectiveness of an appropriate Design 
Standards Manual and its implementation. The 
logotype communicates high technology: it reads 
well on different surfaces and treatments and is 
easily recognizable in motion. Through its 
consistent and appropriate application, it has 
been instrumental in establishing a clear identity 
for the agency. 

"The evolution of the Visual Communication 
System through the various programs of 
publications and posters generally maintains a 
high standard of imaginative design: at the same 
time, the level of communication is accessible 
and educational. The Visual Communication 
System truly captures the spirit and vitality of the 
space program." 




FRANKLIN COURT 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

'Franklin Court in Philadelphia is an inventive 
sculptural statement that evokes a historic set- 
ting. The architects reconstructed five houses on 
Market Street to form one edge of the site. On the 
original location of Benjamin Franklin's house 
and printing shop, they erected a full-size shel- 
tered framework that creatively engages the ob- 
server's imagination. Presenting the house and 
workshop as "ghosts" has also allowed archae- 
ological remains of the building to be preserved 
for viewing in situ. 

"By placing exhibit spaces below ground, the 
architects have made the maximum amount of 
the limited space available for public use. The 
Market Street houses and the large contemporary 
exhibit spaces underground display artifacts re- 
lating to Franklin and to his period in Phila- 
delphia. Franklin Court achieves a blend of 
restoration, imaginative recreation and contem- 
porary design while honoring the requirements 
of each." 



UNIGRID DESIGN PROGRAM 

'The Unigrid Design Program brings uniformity 
and quality to the communications of the 
National Park Service. This agency, one of the 
most advanced in its use of design, has a 
communication program which is admirable in 
many respects. The Unigrid Design Program, 
however, is the cornerstone of the overall 
program. 

"The program fulfills the primary objective ol a 
design system; reducing routine decisions so that 






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tracted, thus enhancing its location near the 
city's Museum of Science. In this sense, its es- 
thetic is drawn from functions within. 

"The Charles River Project is a major public 
works program of the highest order, moving 
beyond a narrow technical mandate to comple- 
ment the larger social, physical and visual 
qualities of its city." 



■a 



SCATTERED INFILL PUBLIC HOUSING 
Charleston, South Carolina 

"The Scattered Infill Public Housing Project is a 
highly commendable example of a sensitive ap- 
proach to public housing. An effective planning 
process created a partnership of the local com- 
munity, involved the City of Charleston, the U.S. 
Dept. of Housing and Urban Development and 
the Charleston Department of Housing and Ur- 
ban Development. These groups chose a develop- 
mental strategy that both increased the supply of 
housing and provided a stimulus to neigh- 
borhood revitalization. Existing open sites were 
carefully selected for their potential for neigh- 
borhood renewal and for their ability to provide 
the necessary social continuity. 

"The choice of a vernacular house type, the 
Charleston 'side-house,' proved to be appropriate 
contexturally and climatically. The use of local 
construction methods, materials, detailing and 
colors helped aesthetically to integrate the struc- 
tures into their surroundings. The new dwellings 
are so skillfully and sensitively designed and sited 
that they do not resemble public housing. User 
satisfaction is high: tenants have been integrated 
into an existing community, thus avoiding the 
stigma often associated with large-scale public- 
housing projects. 

"The infill approach to public housing is 
clearly a time-consuming process requiring the 
utmost commitment from a housing authority. In 
Charleston attractive livable environments have 
been created within stringent budgetary and 
time constraints. These examples are exemplary 
in their social, architectural and urbanistic goals 
and set an important precedent for future public 
housing projects." 



Design Assemblies, the Federal Architec- 
ture Project, the Federal Graphics Im- 
provement Program, and the Excellence 
Attracts Excellence program with the Of- 
fice of Personnel Management. 

The Presidential Design Awards have 
special symbolic value. They call atten- 
tion to design quality at the highest level 
of government. Through the President, they 
bring to all of us a sense of what can be. 



Frank Hodsoll 

Chairman, National Endowment for the Arts 




Report of the 
Presidential Design 
Awards Jury 

The Presidential Design Awards Program 
was established in December 1983 to rec- 
ognize exemplary achievements in Fed- 
eral design in the fields of architecture, 
engineering design, graphic design, inte- 
rior design, landscape architecture, prod- 
uct/industrial design, and urban design 
and planning. This is the first govern- 
ment-wide design awards program and 
its Presidential sponsorship places the is- 
sue of design excellence at the highest 
level of government. 

Quality in design has been a national 
cause since the founding of our Re- 
public. In the planning and design of 
Washington, both George Washington 
and Thomas Jefferson recognized that 
the success of the nation was linked to 
the vision that people had of themselves 
and the buildings that housed their 
institutions. 

In the twentieth century, this condi- 
tion continues with the Federal Design 





effort can be concentrated on quality. The 
implementation of the program demonstrates 
sensitivity to the wide variety of subject matter 
and attention to the finest detail. It is an example 
to others and has already achieved international 
recognition." 



U.S. DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION 
SYMBOL SIGNS 

'The U.S. Department of Transportation has 
developed a coherent system of transportation- 
related symbol signs for use throughout the 
United States. Taking full advantage of work 
done internationally, the American Institute of 
Graphic Arts, in cooperation with the D.O.T., 
compiled an inventory of sign systems. A 
committee of eminent designers reviewed the 
major systems and recommended the 
development of 52 symbols. Taking the best 
elements from other systems but refining each 
symbol, the designers created a balanced new 
system. Now in use in thousands of transport- 
related facilities throughout the country, these 
symbol signs make a valuable contribution to 
communication. 

"This project was undertaken as a means of 
achieving standardization in this field. The jury 
encourages D.O.T to continue evaluating the 
effectiveness of the system and to promote the 
use of these symbols as universally as possible." 





H 



ART-IN-ARCH ITECTU RE PROGRAM 

"Through its recognition of the necessity and 
value of works of art in the public environment 
and its commitment to their placement in public 
Federal facilities, the Art-in-Architecture Pro- 
gram of the General Services Administration has 
demonstrated leadership as a client and produced 
salutory results at over 250 sites in the U.S. and its 
possessions at a cost of only one-half of one per- 
cent of the general contracts. 

"The program is also to be commended for its 
intelligent willingness to sustain potential risks 
in the selection of artists through the solicitation 
of nominations from peer groups appointed by 
the National Endowment for the Arts. 

"Installations that may have been judged by 
the press, critics and others to be difficult to com- 
prehend (or less than completely successful) are 
to be expected in such a courageous program and 
should be interpreted as an index of its con- 
tinuing vitality" 
(Pictured: Batcolumn, Chicago, IL) 



NEW PARTNERSHIP FOR 
RESTORING AMERICAN CITIES 
St. Paul, Minnesota 

This ongoing project shows how urban design 
should be done and what it can do for American 
cities. Lowertown in 1978 was a semi-abandoned 
and deteriorating wholesaling area next to down- 
town St. Paul, Minnesota. Now, nearly six years 
later, it is becoming a lively new community sup- 
porting a rich mixture of activities which rein- 
force one another and complement the 
downtown. In the process, the old urban fabric is 
being conserved and repaired. 

"The jury commends the non-profit Lower- 
town Redevelopment Corporation (LRC), created 
by the City of St. Paul with funding from the 





McKnight Foundation, for its urban design lead- 
ership. The design, financing and marketing 
strategy developed by LRC used small amounts of 
public funding from such Federal agencies as the 
Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, the 
National Endowment for the Arts and the Dept. 
of the Interior to leverage $200 million in private 
investment and create 3,800 jobs. Skillful plan- 
ning of design guidelines, followed by dedicated 
design review, have resulted in preservation, 
adaptive re-use and new construction of quality. 
"This effort has been guided by a creative and 
powerful city-building vision. Unlike old-style ur- 
ban renewal, which depended on massive Federal 
funding and large-scale intervention following a 
fixed plan, Lowertown Redevelopment uses a sub- 
tle approach based on a series of public and pri- 
vate partnerships which allow for continuous 
adjustment of the vision. We recommend that 
other cities follow St. Paul's lead." 



THE GARDENS 

San Mateo, California 

In a world of increasing population and of dimin- 
ishing land available for traditional single-family 
homes, alternative solutions are needed to 
provide housing for our country. Dependency on 
the automobile further restricts ground available 
for construction, and our general affluence exac- 
erbates the problem by demanding larger living 
areas and additional vehicles. 

"The Gardens project in San Mateo, California, 
is a refreshing solution to a difficult site problem. 
Given the insular quality of the site and a lack of 
stimulating surrounding environs, the designers 
elected to turn inward and create a high density 
development based on pedestrian circulation 
spaces and private gardens. The cars are se- 
questered, and buildings accommodate the large 




trees that are already on the site. The individual 
units are small but contain two stories: rooms are 
designed with views of the exterior gardens, 
which create an illusion of more spaciousness. 
Besides creating a wonderful overall ambiance, 
The Gardens themselves are more important be- 
cause they give people opportunities to create 
their own personal statements, their own special 
places. Gardens historically have been metaphors 
of paradise: today they serve to express people's 
dreams in something like the way homesteading 
did in the previous century" 



CHARLES RIVER PROJECT 
Boston, Massachusetts 

'One of historic Boston's finest achievements has 
been the creation and protection of its elaborate 
system of inter-connected public parks and path- 
ways. A feature of this system is the "necklace" 
designed by Frederick Law Olmstead during the 
last century, which weaves a path of green 
through the city's fabric to terminate in the 
Charles River Basin, site of this awarded design. 
The Charles River Project contributes admirably 
to this tradition, while at once resolving the crit- 
ical technical aspects of its program — tidal and 
river flood and pollution control. 

"As a watershed plan, it generates upstream 
recreational and wildlife areas, and extends the 
qualities of the river basin a bit further north, to- 
wards the harbor. As a physical structure, it rein- 
forces the pedestrian inclination of the city by 
offering a foot path connecting two historical 
neighborhoods, Charlestown and the North End. 
As an engineering statement, it opens itself to 
view for the joy and entertainment of those at- 




tracted, thus enhancing its location near the 
city's Museum of Science. In this sense, its es- 
thetic is drawn from functions within. 

"The Charles River Project is a major public 
works program of the highest order, moving 
beyond a narrow technical mandate to comple- 
ment the larger social, physical and visual 
qualities of its city." 



M 



SCATTERED INFILL PUBLIC HOUSING 
Charleston, South Carolina 

The Scattered Infill Public Housing Project is a 
highly commendable example of a sensitive ap- 
proach to public housing. An effective planning 
process created a partnership of the local com- 
munity, involved the City of Charleston, the U.S. 
Dept. of Housing and Urban Development and 
the Charleston Department of Housing and Ur- 
ban Development. These groups chose a develop- 
mental strategy that both increased the supply of 
housing and provided a stimulus to neigh- 
borhood revitalization. Existing open sites were 
carefully selected for their potential for neigh- 
borhood renewal and for their ability to provide 
the necessary social continuity. 

"The choice of a vernacular house type, the 
Charleston 'side-house,' proved to be appropriate 
contexturally and climatically. The use of local 
construction methods, materials, detailing and 
colors helped aesthetically to integrate the struc- 
tures into their surroundings. The new dwellings 
are so skillfully and sensitively designed and sited 
that they do not resemble public housing. User 
satisfaction is high: tenants have been integrated 
into an existing community, thus avoiding the 
stigma often associated with large-scale public- 
housing projects. 

"The infill approach to public housing is 
clearly a time-consuming process requiring the 
utmost commitment from a housing authority. In 
Charleston attractive livable environments have 
been created within stringent budgetary and 
time constraints. These examples are exemplary 
in their social, architectural and urbanistic goals 
and set an important precedent for future public 
housing projects." 



Credits for 
Winning Entries 

A. THE INTERCITY BRIDGE 

• U.S. Department of Transportation, 
Federal Highway Administration 

• Arvid Grant and Associates. Inc., 
Consulting Engineers, Olympia, WA 

B. HISTORIC PRESERVATION 
TAX INCENTIVES PROGRAM 

• U.S. Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service 

C. TH E SEATTLE FOOT T * 

• Veterans Administration, Rehabilitation, 
Research and Development Service 

• Prosthetic Research Study, Dr. Ernest 
M. Burgess, Director, Seattle, WA 

• Model & Instrument Works, Inc., < 
Donald L. Poggi, Engineer, Seattle, WA 

D. LINN COVE VIADUCT 

• U.S. Department of the Interior, National 
Park Service • U.S. Department of Transpor- 
tation, Federal Highway Administration 

• Figg 6- Muller, Engineers, Inc., 
Tallahassee, FL • Jasper Construction 
Company, Atlanta, GA 

E. N. A. S.A. VISUAL COMMUNICA- 
TION SYSTEM AND GRAPHIC WORKS 

» National Aeronautics & Space Admin. ' 

» Dannefr Blackburn, Inc., Designers, NY 
» White and Associates, Designers, 
Los Angeles, CA 

F. FRANKLIN COURT 

• U.S. Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service • Venturi, Rauch and 
Scott Brown, Architects, Philadelphia, PA 

G. UNIGRID DESIGN PROGRAM 

• U.S. Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service 

• Vignelli Associates, Designers, NY 

H. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF 
TRANSPORTATION SYMBOL SIGNS 

» U.S. Department of Transportation 

• American Institute of Graphic Arts, NY 
" A.I.G.A. Signs & Symbols Committee, 
Thomas Geismar, Chairman • Cook & 
Shanosky Assoc, Designers, Princeton, NJ 

I. ART-IN-ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM 

• U.S. General Services Administration, 
Art-in-Architecture Program 

k r J. NEW PARTNERSHIP FOR 
k RESTORING AMERICAN CITIES 

• U.S. Department of Housing and 
Urban Development 

• Lowertown Redevelopment Corporation, 
Weiming Lu, Executive Director • City 
of Si. Paul -George Latimer, Mayor; 
Douglas Foster, Urban Designer 
• Port Authority of St. Paul, MN 
• The McKnight Foundation, Minneapolis, MN 
Bentz, Thompson, Rietow, Inc., 
Architects, Minneapolis, MN 
1 Rafferty, Rafferty, Mikutowski, Roney 
& Associates, Architects, St. Paul, MN 
"» Miller, Hanson, Westerbeck, 
Bell Architects, Inc., Minneapolis, MN 



;. THE GARDENS 
U.S. Department of Housing and 
Urban Development • Backen Arrigoni 
&■ Ross.Jnc, Architects, San Francisco, CA 

• POD, Inc., Landscape Architects, 
Orange, CA • J.S. Papp Associates, Inc., 
Structural Engineers, Redwood, CA 

L. CHARLES RIVER PROJECT 

• U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 
New England Division 

• CE Maguirc, Inc., Engineers, 
Waltham, MA 

M. SCATTERED INFILL PUBLIC HOUSING 

• U.S. Department of Housing and 
Urban Development • City of Charleston, 
Joseph P. Riley, Mayor; Donald Cameron, 
Executive Director, Housing Authority 

• Bradficld Associates, Architects, 
Atlanta, GA • Middleton, McMillan, 
Architects, Inc., Charleston, SC 




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